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Speaker's Bureau

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Newman University is pleased to offer its Speaker's Bureau to the communities it serves. Speakers consist of Newman faculty and staff and the topics vary widely. The Speaker's Bureau is provided free of charge to non profit organizations. Speakers are available to for-profit organizations for a $100 donation to the Newman Fund, Newman's largest scholarship fund for students.

To find your speaker, search below by category and then zero in on the topic or speaker that interests you, then complete the online form. Once the speaker approves and is booked, you'll work directly with the speaker for the final arrangements.

Health

The Epidemic of Type 2 Diabetes

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Description:
This is a one hour presentation intended for the general public that gives an overview of Type 2 Diabetes. Information will include etiology, the growing prevalence of this disease, prevention, symptoms, nutrition, exercise, possible complications, and available management.  With the increased rate of obesity, especially childhood obesity, this disease has been making headline news. 

Debbie Strickert

Debbie Strickert
Professor of Nursing

About the speaker:
Debbie Strickert is beginning her 20th year as an Associate Professor of Nursing.  She is an ARNP and also works PRN at Via Christi Family Medicine Clinics and PRN as a Diabetic Nurse Educator. She teaches medical-surgical nursing in Newman's BSN program and also co-coordinates the RN Refresher course.

Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

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Description:
This is a one or one and a half hour presentation intended for family members of loved ones afflicted with this disease or lay people in the community who want to gain a better understanding of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The etiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms are addressed. Non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments are reviewed along with common behaviors and tips for therapeutic interactions. This is intended to be a broad overview of AD and is designed to better equip families in their care of individuals afflicted with AD. 

Amy Siple

Amy Siple, M.N.
Department of Nursing

About the speaker:
Amy Siple is an Associate Professor of nursing as well as a nurse practitioner (NP). She has been serving the needs of older adult residents in long term care centers as an NP for 12 years and is currently associated with the largest geriatric practice in Kansas, Wichita Medical Associates. Amy has lectured on the topic of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) more than 100 times in 10 states over the past 5 years. She is recognized in the professional community as an expert in this field.

Higher Education

What's New at NU?

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Description:
Dr. Noreen Carrocci, President of Newman University, speaks about higher education issues with a special emphasis on the quality and affordability of private, non-profit higher education in Kansas and nationally. She loves to talk about Newman University – our sponsors (the Adorers of the Blood of Christ), our history, what's happening today, and what we're planning for the future.

Noreen M. Carrocci

Noreen M. Carrocci Ph.D.
President of Newman University

About the speaker:
Noreen M. Carrocci, Ph.D. is the fourth female and the first lay woman to hold the office of president at Newman University. She began her tenure as president in 2007. Dr. Carrocci has a strong background in Catholic higher education that includes experience in and out of the classroom. She came to Newman from Spring Hill College in Mobile, Ala., where she served as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs (1998-2007). Carrocci also served as faculty and administrator at the University of St. Thomas (MN; 1994-98), and Saint Louis University (1979-1994). She received her undergraduate degree in communication and psychology from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She then earned a Master of Arts and a doctoral degree in communication from the University of Kansas.

Which college?  How to choose.

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Description:
As students begin high school, they receive an increasing barrage of mail and contacts from colleges and universities.  This presentation offers ideas about questions that should be asked and answers that should be received to make an informed decision about where to apply to college and where to ultimately attend.  The presentation will conclude with a question and answer period. Some of the questions considered include:

  • Where do you want to be in four years? 
  • How important is major selection?
  • What should you look for on a campus visit?
  • What is your comfort level about…?
  • How much should parents impact this decision? 
  • How do you compare sticker price with actual cost of attending?

Rosemary Niedens

Rosemary Niedens
Associate Vice President for Academic Services

About the speaker:
Rosemary Niedens has been teaching servant leadership and leadership studies at Newman University for over twelve years.  Currently, she is the Associate Vice President for Academic Services with responsibility for freshmen programming, concurrent enrollment, academic support services as well as the ASC Community Leader Scholar program.  In service, Niedens serves on a variety of boards and committees as well as the co-area coordinator for the ASC Associate program.  She presents widely on the concepts of service and servant leadership in addition to providing retreats about growing in personal mission.

History

Alexander the Great in Afghanistan

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Description:
The legend of Alexander the Great looms large in history and in the popular imagination.  The realities of his campaigns in Asia also tell a story of the harsh realities required for winning a land battle and winning the peace in a region dominated by harsh geography, decentralized political factions and limited resources. What can we learn from the past as we pursue our own aims in Afghanistan? 

Cheryl Golden

Cheryl Golden, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Director of the Division of Humanities

About the speaker:
Cheryl Golden is a professor of ancient history at Newman University.  Completing advanced degrees at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and the University of Houston, her teaching and research interests include Greece, Rome, the ancient Near East in areas related to legal, military and political history.  She is currently editing an article on Thucydides' geographic analysis of Thrace and a book on Poisons in the Roman World for Routledge. Working at Newman has allowed Golden to explore a variety of subjects as a generalist, teach abroad in the Netherlands and escort students abroad to England, Italy and Greece.

Is Willa Cather an Historian of the Great Plains?

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Description:
Willa Cather is one of the United States' greatest prose stylists.  Is she also an historian, in particular of the Great Plains?  Dr. Rohrbach examines Cathers' works set on the Great Plains, with special emphasis on her masterpiece My Antonia, to explore this challenging question.  Dr. Rohrbach's Czech heritage sparked her interest in this research, an interest which has grown into a passion.  She uses maps, charts, and quotes to further illustrate her thesis and conclusion. 

Charlotte Rohrbach

Charlotte Rohrbach, ASC, Ph.D.
Director of Mission and Archives

About the speaker:
Dr. Rohrbach, a professor emerita in history, has served in many administrative positions at Newman University during her over 30 year tenure.  She is currently the Director of Mission and Archives.  She received her masters degree in History from Creighton University and her doctorate in American Studies from St. Louis University.  Her doctoral research was on Willa Cather as an historian.  She has lectured throughout Wichita and Kansas on various topics including Cather, the Great Plains, Native Americans, and United States Immigration.

Tour the Cathedral Kilgen Pipe Organ

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Description:
Many people are enjoying tours of the newly renovated and restored Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita but few have experienced the amazing "works" of the Cathedral Kilgen pipe organ in the choir/organ loft. Learn of and experience the sights and sounds of this nearly 3,000 pipe musical treasure of the Cathedral from long-time Cathedral organist, Carole Pracht. (A separate tour of the entire Cathedral may also be arranged.)

Carole Pracht

Carole Pracht
Instructor/Piano, Organ

About the speaker:
Carole Pracht is a pianist, organist, and teacher. Present positions include Newman University instructor of keyboard studies and choral assistant, principal organist for Wichita Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and accompanist for the Heart of American Men's Chorus. She continues to serve the Kansas and National Music Teachers' Associations and the American Guild of Organists. A regional adjudicator and clinician, Carole's passion for piano and organ is reflected in many students throughout years of teaching who are now organists, pianists, teachers and supporters of music for future generations. Personal music goal: "Excellence in the performance of all musical styles with an added emphasis for excellence in church music."

Women's Work: Poisons and Women in Roman Culture:

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Description:
The topic of poison in any society readily brings to mind both accidental and intentional hazards. Household cleaning products and pesticides serve to make our homes safe from some contaminants while creating dangers themselves. The medicine cabinet, containing prescription drugs and other remedies, holds cures, usually safe for the patient, but potentially fatal to others. Outside the household industrial pollution gives us ecological concerns. The city of Rome in the first centuries B.C. and A.D. dealt with many of the same problems. The Roman senate crafted legislation to regulate the sale of hemlock, aconite and opium in the market place and the women who knew how to use these substances. In western literature there is the perception that women who murder do so by stealth or cunning while men murder through force. In the Roman court room and in Roman literature we find examples of women taking advantage of their roles as cooks, healers, mothers, providing food, medicine, and other potions to their unsuspecting "loved ones" only to have their victims fall to feminine foul play. Why?

Cheryl Golden

Cheryl Golden, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Director of the Division of Humanities

About the speaker:
Cheryl Golden is a professor of ancient history at Newman University.  Completing advanced degrees at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and the University of Houston, her teaching and research interests include Greece, Rome, the ancient Near East in areas related to legal, military and political history.  She is currently editing an article on Thucydides' geographic analysis of Thrace and a book on Poisons in the Roman World for Routledge. Working at Newman has allowed Golden to explore a variety of subjects as a generalist, teach abroad in the Netherlands and escort students abroad to England, Italy and Greece.

Literature

Adapting History into Dramatic Literature

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Description:
The oldest extant play or artifact of dramatic literature is The Persians by Aeschylus, originally produced in 472 BCE. Dramatic literature, a written record of past theatrical events and sub-genre of literature is studied every day all over the world. The Persians is unique in the canon of ancient Greek plays that usually drew their subjects from mythology, for it is a history play. Shakespeare wrote at least 10 history plays, using Holinshed's Chronicles as a major source. Most of Frederick Von Schiller's work could also be classified as history plays. In the 20th century popular plays such as A Lion in Winter and A Man for All Seasons also fit the genre. In turning history into dramatic literature, what choices does the playwright make in deciding how to tell the story? How can their view slant perceptions of the actual events in the telling. How can a playwright turn dry sometimes mundane events into exciting theatre? This lecture will look at the 2500 year old dance between history and theatre in an attempt to inspire new history plays.

Mark T. Mannette

Mark T. Mannette, M.F.A.
Director of Theatre

About the speaker:
Mark T. Mannette received his MFA in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature in Performance from Mary Baldwin College in partnership with the American Shakespeare Center. A member of Actor's Equity since 1998, Mark has acted in over one hundred plays, playing such roles as Leontes in A Winter's Tale and Oscar in The Odd Couple. From 2007-2011 he was a theatre professor at St. Andrews Presbyterian College in North Carolina. His history play, The Butcher, The Thief, and the Buyer of Beef was produced there in 2008. From 1998-2003 he was the Resident Playwright for the Orange County Regional History Center in Orlando. His history play, Dr. Phillips & the Rainmaker was published in 2003. He is also co-founder of the Playwrights Round Table in Orlando and member of the Playwrights' Center in Minneapolis.

Drawn to Marvel: Pop-Classicism and Poetry of Comics

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Description:
Myth did not end in the Middle Ages; midrash didn't muddle to a close with Medieval Rabbis. The urge to explore what is not, to contain what our brains can't, evolves as culture evolves, making, say, the trinity of Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman as worthy of poetic inquiry as any postmortem pantheon. Today's superhero poetry, like the best superhero archetypes themselves, takes one of four tacks to draw us back to marvel. Poems in this genre return wonder to the world by making the mundane super. They return wonder to the world by making the super mundane. They return wonder to modern myths by reviving the superhero, reconnecting the latter to its ancient origins. And finally, they return wonder to the very tradition of the mythic by reconnecting us to the sublime, to the Romantic even, through a "pop" back door.

Bryan Dietrich

Bryan Dietrich Ph.D.
Professor of English

About the speaker:
Bryan D. Dietrich is the author of six books of poems, Krypton Nights, Universal Monsters, Love Craft, The Assumption, Prime Directive, and The Monstrance. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Nation, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, Harvard Review, Yale Review, and many other journals. He has won The Paris Review Poetry Prize, a Discovery/The Nation Award, and a Writers at Work Fellowship, Bryan has also been nominated for both the Pushcart and the Pulitzer Prizes.

A Glimpse into a Medieval Manuscript

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Description:
This presentation centers on the beautiful seventh-century Lindisfarne Gospels. The history, visual and literary features of the manuscript will be explained through selections from the gospel of John and one or more of the synoptic gospels.

Susan Crane-Laracuente

Susan Crane-Laracuente, Ph.D.
Professor of English and Chair of the Division of Arts & Sciences

About the speaker:
Susan Crane-Laracuente is an Assistant Professor of English and has taught courses in writing, the structure and history of English, world literature and Latin. She earned a degree in English with a focus on medieval literature in Old English and Latin in 2006 from Stony Brook University in New York. She serves on the editorial board of This Rough Magic, an online academic journal dedicated to the teaching of medieval and renaissance literature.

Riddle Me This: Latin and Old English Riddles

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Description:
Many cultures around the world have created riddles to teach and to entertain. Some riddle traditions are traceable through centuries; the ancient Anglo-Saxon riddle tradition is among these. This interactive presentation offers tantalizing examples of Anglo-Saxon riddles originally composed in Latin and Old English.

Susan Crane-Laracuente

Susan Crane-Laracuente, Ph.D.
Professor of English and Chair of the Division of Arts & Sciences

About the speaker:
Susan Crane-Laracuente is an Assistant Professor of English and has taught courses in writing, the structure and history of English, world literature and Latin. She earned a degree in English with a focus on medieval literature in Old English and Latin in 2006 from Stony Brook University in New York. She serves on the editorial board of This Rough Magic, an online academic journal dedicated to the teaching of medieval and renaissance literature.

Why Shakespeare Wrote His Own Plays

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Description:
In reaction to the recent release of the Roland Emmerich's film Anonymous which asserts that the Earl of Oxford, not William Shakespeare, wrote the canon of plays and poems normally attributed to William Shakespeare, Professor Mannette throws down the gauntlet in opposition to that point of view. In this lecture, Mannette demonstrates how Shakespeare as a man of the theatre not only wrote the plays and poems, but evidence corroborating that fact can be found in the writing of his contemporaries and the plays and poems themselves. Some think it impossible that someone without a college education could have written such a body of work and that the plays are written with an insider's view of politics and court intrigue. What about all of the other aspects of life depicted in his work? For those seeking an informed and impassioned rebuttal to the current film or those who wish to defend the Oxfordian claims in debate a format, invite Professor Mannette to speak on the simple subject that Shakespeare was in fact Shakespeare.

Mark T. Mannette

Mark T. Mannette, M.F.A.
Director of Theatre

About the speaker:
Mark T. Mannette received his MFA in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature in Performance from Mary Baldwin College in partnership with the American Shakespeare Center. A member of Actor's Equity since 1998, Mark has acted in over one hundred plays, playing such roles as Leontes in A Winter's Tale and Oscar in The Odd Couple. From 2007-2011 he was a theatre professor at St. Andrews Presbyterian College in North Carolina. His history play, The Butcher, The Thief, and the Buyer of Beef was produced there in 2008. From 1998-2003 he was the Resident Playwright for the Orange County Regional History Center in Orlando. His history play, Dr. Phillips & the Rainmaker was published in 2003. He is also co-founder of the Playwrights Round Table in Orlando and member of the Playwrights' Center in Minneapolis.

WWDDWW: What Would Dante Do...With Werewolves?

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Description:
The werewolf tale is a Gothic tale, a tale that tells us we need to address the repressed buried within ourselves, lest it be released to consume us. Native American tradition provides us with the names of three different types of werewolf—the Nagual, the Manitou, and the Wendigo—which, while ultimately incarnating the same potentially destructive force, help us define the source of manifestation. The idea of what role the will plays in damnation is central, also, to Dante's design of Hell in The Inferno, and the categories that Dante uses to define the levels of culpability for sin—symbolized as the leopard, the lion, and the she-wolf—can be used to define the parameters of the werewolf archetype and its commentary on humanity, culpability, and the mind.

Bryan Dietrich

Bryan Dietrich Ph.D.
Professor of English

About the speaker:
Bryan D. Dietrich is the author of six books of poems, Krypton Nights, Universal Monsters, Love Craft, The Assumption, Prime Directive, and The Monstrance. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Nation, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Paris Review, Harvard Review, Yale Review, and many other journals. He has won The Paris Review Poetry Prize, a Discovery/The Nation Award, and a Writers at Work Fellowship, Bryan has also been nominated for both the Pushcart and the Pulitzer Prizes.

Marriage and Family

What Science is Telling Us about Healthy Marriages and Families

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Description:
Recent large scale studies have provided burgeoning evidence suggesting that there are a few critical elements that are evident in vitalized marriages. Furthermore these elements can be learned and applied with compelling results. Mike Duxler Ph.D. will present preliminary findings of a recently completed nationwide research study that involved 800 Wichita married couples with children. There will be discussion involving how these findings can be applied to families, communities and state policies.

Mike Duxler

Mike Duxler, Ph.D.
Professor of Social Work

About the speaker:
Mike Duxler, Ph.D., Associate Professor School of Social Work, has most recently directed Catholic Charities' Marriage for Keeps (MfK) research project. MfK was one of 8 sites across the country to implement one of the largest random assignment marriage studies ever conducted. Mike Duxler is a national speaker in the area of strengthening marriages and has been working with local, state and the federal government in helping to shape effective social policy that better supports healthy families. Dr. Duxler has been a faculty member at Newman University since 2002. Prior to coming to Newman he was a clinical practitioner, for 14 years, specializing in marriage and a family researcher at Timberlawn Psychiatric Hospital in Dallas, Texas.

Personal Development

How to Get Started Writing your Spiritual Memoir

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Description:
This workshop will help you find engaging subjects and experiences to write about. In addition, we will practice some of the techniques associated with vivid personal writing, such as dialogue, description, sensory writing, scene, voice, figurative language, apt word choice, and well-sculpted sentences with good muscle tone. Ultimately, the workshop will set you on the path toward writing with power and vitality, qualities that are welcome in any type of writing. Please allow a minimum of one hour for this presentation, ideal length is two hours.

Marguerite Regan

Marguerite Regan, Ph.D.
Director of Adult and Continuing Studies

About the speaker:
Marguerite Regan is Assistant Professor of English at Newman University where she teaches courses in writing, British and World Literatures, and Shakespeare, among others. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville in 2001. Recently, she rewrote and edited the book The Journey Home: Autobiography of an American Swami. In addition to the writing of creative nonfiction, her research interests include eighteenth-century literature and the cultural poetics/politics of food, particularly the rise of a dietary protest literature in England from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth century. She has also published and presented articles on the use of food and food imagery in the works of James Joyce and in the yoga tradition.

"Praise the Lord" in Church Music - A workshop for church organists and pianists

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Description:
Serving the Church in music is a challenge of musicianship and knowledge of liturgy! Improve your musicianship, service playing knowledge and skill. Expand your repertoire, and re-inspire your "musician self" in service to your church and worship of God. Presented by Carole Pracht, Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception organist.

Carole Pracht

Carole Pracht
Instructor/Piano, Organ

About the speaker:
Carole Pracht is a pianist, organist, and teacher. Present positions include Newman University instructor of keyboard studies and choral assistant, principal organist for Wichita Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and accompanist for the Heart of American Men's Chorus. She continues to serve the Kansas and National Music Teachers' Associations and the American Guild of Organists. A regional adjudicator and clinician, Carole's passion for piano and organ is reflected in many students throughout years of teaching who are now organists, pianists, teachers and supporters of music for future generations. Personal music goal: "Excellence in the performance of all musical styles with an added emphasis for excellence in church music."

Professional Development & Leadership

Conquering Self: A Key Competency for Effective Leadership

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Description:
To lead effectively, you need to know and understand yourself. This means becoming aware of our triggers or hot buttons--things that people say or do that set us off and get in the way of our ability to exercise leadership. We will explore the following questions: What are your triggers? How do you respond when triggered? Am I more or less effective at engaging in acts of leadership when I'm triggered? How can I manage my triggers? This interactive talk will allow you to identify your triggers and then explore ways of managing them.

Audrey Curtis Hane

Audrey Curtis Hane, Ph.D.
Professor of Communications

About the speaker:
Dr. Audrey Curtis Hane is the Dean of Graduate Studies at Newman University, where she is a professor of Communication. Dr. Hane has won several awards, including the E.C. Buehler Outstanding Teaching Fellowship Award from the University of Kansas in 1995 where she earned her Ph.D., and the Newman University Outstanding Mentor Award in 1999. Her expertise and commitment to teaching earned her the 2003 Newman University Teaching Excellence Award, an annual recognition to a full-time faculty member who has demonstrated an innovative or dynamic approach to courses, course revisions, and teaching techniques. In 2004, she was awarded the excellence in academic advising award in response to her work with student advisees. In 2006, the Wichita Business Journal named Dr. Hane to its "40 Under 40" class. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. Hane has conducted communication training for many clients, including the City of Wichita, Sedgwick County, the State of Kansas, the United Way, Wichita State University and others. She has also served as a communication consultant for Learjet Bombardier Aerospace, the Hunter Health Clinic, Grace Presbyterian Church, the Junior League of Wichita and the Kansas Health Institute. She is a member of the National Communication Association.

Let's Do Lunch

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Description:
Come brush up on your business dining etiquette. We'll cover strategies for building relationships with colleagues and clients whether you're gathered around the conference table or the dining table. The following topics will be covered: Practicing business meeting etiquette; Planning a successful business lunch; Dining etiquette for business meals. Professional etiquette will help you gain confidence, differentiate yourself in a competitive market, and honor your organization's commitment to quality and excellence.

Audrey Curtis Hane

Audrey Curtis Hane, Ph.D.
Professor of Communications

About the speaker:
Dr. Audrey Curtis Hane is the Dean of Graduate Studies at Newman University, where she is a professor of Communication. Dr. Hane has won several awards, including the E.C. Buehler Outstanding Teaching Fellowship Award from the University of Kansas in 1995 where she earned her Ph.D., and the Newman University Outstanding Mentor Award in 1999. Her expertise and commitment to teaching earned her the 2003 Newman University Teaching Excellence Award, an annual recognition to a full-time faculty member who has demonstrated an innovative or dynamic approach to courses, course revisions, and teaching techniques. In 2004, she was awarded the excellence in academic advising award in response to her work with student advisees. In 2006, the Wichita Business Journal named Dr. Hane to its "40 Under 40" class. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. Hane has conducted communication training for many clients, including the City of Wichita, Sedgwick County, the State of Kansas, the United Way, Wichita State University and others. She has also served as a communication consultant for Learjet Bombardier Aerospace, the Hunter Health Clinic, Grace Presbyterian Church, the Junior League of Wichita and the Kansas Health Institute. She is a member of the National Communication Association.

Narratives as Inspiration: Motivating Your Audience to Act

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Description:
Have you ever been asked to speak to an audience, only to have the usual questions run through your head: What should I say, and how should I say it? Why does everyone nod their head when I'm speaking, but then nothing happens? They hear the same stuff all the time; what can I say to fire them up? Learn how to capture the power of the narrative in order to move your audience to action. We will examine how to design motivating messages by delivering powerful stories. In particular, you will learn how to tell stories that uplift and motivate by utilizing two proven strategies: the challenge plot and the connection plot.

Audrey Curtis Hane

Audrey Curtis Hane, Ph.D.
Professor of Communications

About the speaker:
Dr. Audrey Curtis Hane is the Dean of Graduate Studies at Newman University, where she is a professor of Communication. Dr. Hane has won several awards, including the E.C. Buehler Outstanding Teaching Fellowship Award from the University of Kansas in 1995 where she earned her Ph.D., and the Newman University Outstanding Mentor Award in 1999. Her expertise and commitment to teaching earned her the 2003 Newman University Teaching Excellence Award, an annual recognition to a full-time faculty member who has demonstrated an innovative or dynamic approach to courses, course revisions, and teaching techniques. In 2004, she was awarded the excellence in academic advising award in response to her work with student advisees. In 2006, the Wichita Business Journal named Dr. Hane to its "40 Under 40" class. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. Hane has conducted communication training for many clients, including the City of Wichita, Sedgwick County, the State of Kansas, the United Way, Wichita State University and others. She has also served as a communication consultant for Learjet Bombardier Aerospace, the Hunter Health Clinic, Grace Presbyterian Church, the Junior League of Wichita and the Kansas Health Institute. She is a member of the National Communication Association.

Servant Leadership and Personal Mission: Putting the Pieces Together

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Description:
St. John Henry Newman famously stated that everyone has a life mission that has been entrusted to no other. For many, this mission may be operationalized in the concepts of servant leadership. Stressing the first and foremost duty of a leader is to serve the group led; servant leadership offers a pragmatic approach to growing in leadership. This interactive presentation allows participants to begin the process of exploring their own leadership potential using these concepts of servant leadership.

Rosemary Niedens

Rosemary Niedens
Associate Vice President for Academic Services

About the speaker:
Rosemary Niedens has been teaching servant leadership and leadership studies at Newman University for over twelve years.  Currently, she is the Associate Vice President for Academic Services with responsibility for freshmen programming, concurrent enrollment, academic support services as well as the ASC Community Leader Scholar program.  In service, Niedens serves on a variety of boards and committees as well as the co-area coordinator for the ASC Associate program.  She presents widely on the concepts of service and servant leadership in addition to providing retreats about growing in personal mission.