Web Based Plagiarism Tutorial

Plagiarism

Learn About Plagiarism

What is plagiarism?

The words or ideas people produce are considered to be their property. Others may "borrow" these words or ideas, but when they do, they must give credit to the person who originally wrote or thought them. Plagiarism is "stealing" someone else's words or ideas by using them in a way that makes them appear to be yours.

What are Newman's plagiarism policies?

Newman University's ethics code states that plagiarism is:

  • The use of another's written work without appropriate citation
  • The use of another student's work
  • The purchase and/or use of an already prepared paper
  • The borrowing of an idea or phrase or the paraphrasing of an idea or   material without proper documentation.
  • Downloading materials from the Internet or World Wide Web and submitting them for credit (or partial credit) as one's own work.

What are the consequences of plagiarism?

At Newman, students found participating in plagiarism may face the following consequences:

  • An F for the written work
  • An individual faculty member has the right to impose more severe penalties. Infractions of this code may be referred to the Academic Review Board. The university has the right to dismiss a student for this infraction.
  • In real life, plagiarism may result in a person being fired from his or her job.

How can I avoid plagiarism?

Avoiding plagiarism is actually quite simple. Any time you use words or ideas from someone else, you must be sure to give them credit by citing them. This means that you must give the reader enough information to find the words or ideas as they were originally written, and indicate which words were created by the original author.

There are many different ways to cite sources. Several different citation styles are used in this tutorial's examples, but they will not attempt to teach you how to use all the styles. For now, it is important to know three things:

  1. You should cite your source whenever it is mentioned in your paper.
  2. You should provide detailed information about your source in a bibliography or list of references at the end of your paper.
  3. If you use the exact words of your source, you should put them in "quotation marks."

Plagiarism Examples

Note: This psychology example uses APA citation style and is taken from J. Reifsteck's 2005 article "Failure and Success in the Foster Care Program," which appeared in the North American Journal of Psychology, volume 7, issue 2, on pg. 313.

Original text:

In recent years, the number of youth in foster care nationally has remained steady at approximately 550,000.

Plagiarized version:

The number of youth in foster care nationally has remained steady at approximately 550,000.

Correctly quoted version:

According to Reifsteck (2005), "the number of youth in foster care nationally has remained steady at approximately 550,000" (p. 313).

References

Reifsteck, J. (2005). Failure and success in foster care program. North American Journal of Psychology, 7(2), 313.

Explanation:  This is word-for-word plagiarism because the student has used the exact words of the source without putting them in quotation marks.  In addition, the student does not indicate the source of the quote in the text or at the end of the paper.

Explanation: This example is quoted correctly. The words copied from the article are indicated by the use of "quotation marks." Immediately before and after the quote, the student gives information about the author and location of the quote. Complete information for finding the article is given at the end of the paper.

Note: This theology example uses Turabian (Chicago) citation style and is taken from Helen Doohan's article "Courageous Leadership," which appeared in the September/October 2004 issue of Bible Today on pages 269-271.

Original text:

Thus we see Matthew, an insightful leader, using his knowledge of the tradition as a basis for reinterpretation.

Plagiarized version:

Matthew was an insightful leader. He used his knowledge of tradition to reinterpret scripture.

References

Doohan, Helen. "Courageous Leadership." Bible Today (September/October 2004): 269-271

Correctly paraphrased version:

Matthew was an insightful leader. He used his knowledge of tradition to reinterpret scripture (Doohan 2004, 271).

References

Doohan, Helen. "Courageous Leadership." Bible Today (September/October 2004): 269-271

Explanation: This is an example of paraphrasing plagiarism. The student has changed the wording and sentence structure somewhat, but the sentence is still clearly patterned on the words and ideas of the original author. The student does mention the source at the end of the paper, but does not indicate in the body of the paper that these two sentences are based on someone else's words and ideas.

Explanation: In this case, the student uses an in-text citation, which provides information about the author and location of the words and ideas s/he used. Together with the complete citation at the end of the paper, this helps the reader recognize where the student has borrowed someone else's words and ideas, and be able to locate the original information if necessary.

Note: This nursing example usesAPA citation style and is taken from B.K. Timby's January 2005 article "Seasonal Affective Disorder: Shedding Light on the Wintertime Blues," which appeared in Nursing 2005.

Original text:

One treatment for SAD is phototherapy, a technique that uses a light to simulate intense sunlight.

Plagiarized version:

Phototherapy is a technique that uses a light to simulate intense sunlight (Timby, 2005).

References

Timby, B. K. (2005, January ). Seasonal affective disorder: shedding light on the wintertime blues. Nursing2005, 35(1). Retrieved June 20, 2005

Correctly quoted version:

Phototherapy is "a technique that uses a light to simulate intense sunlight" (Timby, 2005, p. 18).

References

Timby, B. K. (2005, January ). Seasonal affective disorder: shedding light on the wintertime blues. Nursing2005, 35(1), 18.

Explanation: This is word-for-word plagiarism. Although the student has changed the beginning of the sentence, the bulk of it is identical to the original author. Although s/he uses an in-text citation and complete citation at the end of the paper, there are no quotation marks to indicate the words that are identical to the author's original words.

Explanation: The student uses quotation marks to show which words belong to the original author, provides an in-text citation to indicate the source of the quote, and gives a complete citation at the end of the paper.

Note: This English example uses MLA citation style and is taken from Paul K. Longmore's June 2005 article "They Speak Better English Than The English Do," which appeared in Early American Literature.

Original Text:

As one result, dominant colonial groups are acutely aware of the metropolitan standard of the language they share with the homeland.

Plagiarized Version:

Dominant colonial groups are aware of the metropolitan standard of the language they share with the homeland.

Correctly Quoted Version:

"Dominant colonial groups are acutely aware of the metropolitan standard of the language they share with the homeland" (Longmore 279)

Works Cited

Longmore, Paul K. "They Speak Better English Than the English Do." Early American Literature 40.2 (2005): 279-282.

Explanation: This is word-for-word plagiarism. Although the student has changed a few words the bulk of it is identical to the original authors. There are no quotation marks to indicate the words that are identical to the author's original words.

Explanation: The student uses quotation marks to show which words belong to the original author, provides an in-text citation to indicate the source of the quote, and gives a complete citation at the end of the paper.

Note: This history example uses Turabian (Chicago) style citation and is taken from Lynn A. Struve's fall/winter 2004 article "Confucian PTSD," which appeared in History and Memory

Original Text:

The violence of the fall of the Ming and the Qing conquest having been so protracted and extensive, it is not surprising that many of the personal accounts evince great psychological as well as physical suffering.

Plagiarized version:

The violence of the collapse of the Ming and Qing conquest was prolonged and extensive. Witnesses blame the violence for causing them great psychological as well as physical suffering.

References

Struve, Lynn A.,"Confucian PTSD," History and Memory (Fall/Winter 2004) 14-18.

Correctly Paraphrased Version:

The end of the Ming and Qing conquest resulted in widespread violence. Several personal accounts demonstrate psychological and physical suffering due to the immense violence. (Struve 2004, 15)

References

Struve, Lynn A., "Confucian PTSD," History and Memory (Fall/Winter 2004) 14-18.

Explanation: This is an example of paraphrasing plagiarism. The student has changed the wording and sentence structure somewhat, but the sentence is still clearly patterned on the words and ideas of the original author. The student does mention the source at the end of the paper, but does not indicate in the body of the paper that these two sentences are based on someone else's words and ideas.

Explanation: In this case, the student uses an in-text citation, which provides information about the author and location of the words and ideas s/he used. Together with the complete citation at the end of the paper, this helps the reader recognize where the student has borrowed someone else's words and ideas, and be able to locate the original information if necessary.